When everyone gathered for this photo, I was nowhere to be found.  They called and called my name, but I had wandered back to my neighborhood a few blocks up the mountain and did not hear them calling.  Frustration mounted as my siblings were sent out to find me and returned empty handed.

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When I finally did return some time later, I got a big lecture and a good spanking.  Since I had soiled my clothes while playing and was not presentable for the occasion, my father's secretary, Mr. Sim, who took this picture, lent me the shirt off of his back and "Uncle" Bruce (Reverend Hunt) put one of his bow ties on me.  

When this picture was snapped, everyone was in a bad mood over my irresponsible behavior but hid their displeasure well with their made-for-camera smiles. 

Mr. SIM Jae Man, the photographer who took the picture.

     A REALLY GOOD SPANKING

      The Story of How I Ended Up Wearing

       the Photographer's Shirt and Bruce

                       Hunt's Bow Tie

By:  Dr. Rodney T. Hard



While looking through old family photos after my father passed away from cancer on 03-15-2009, I came upon this picture, and a strong and unforgettable memory swept through my consciousness.  The smiles on the faces of those gathered for this picture belie the tension and drama leading up to the picture.  This picture, with me in the middle, was taken shortly after I received a good spanking for the turmoil I had created.

I believe in the old adage, "Spare the rod and spoil the child."  Most of the spankings I received were well deserved and helped to shape me into the man I am today.  I was a mischievous and sometimes ornery young boy, and I seem to recollect getting more spankings than my younger brothers or my younger sister did.  My older brother, Sterling, got the worst of it.  My younger siblings probably learned to behave better just from watching us older brothers get punished and not wanting any part of that.  Or, maybe my parents just tired of the process and tried other parenting methods on the younger ones.  Who knows?


Anyway, the Hards, the Hunts, and the Spooners are the three Korean missionary families depicted.  We had just had dinner at the Hunt's house in Pusan, Korea, and I had run off afterwards to play in the neighborhood with my Korean friends.  This was a farewell dinner for the Spooners who were leaving Korea and the adults wanted to get one last group photo of all of us together.  

Dr. Rodney T. Hard